The Borderline Patient - A Case Study | HealthyPlace

 

personality disorder case study examples

Aug 21,  · Diagnosis: Borderline Personality Disorder Background Outline the major symptoms of this disorder. The DSM – V describes Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) as a disorder that manifests in early adulthood as a pattern of instability in “relationships, self-image, and affects, and impulsivity” (p. ). Criteria for BPD includes, the individual portrays aggressive effort to avoid real. Mar 29,  · The person who suffers from Borderline Personality disorder has a greater than usual vulnerability to a regressive This case study could have easily been about a . Case Study #6 — Schizotypal Personality Disorder Background Information Tyler is a 15 year old male who is currently living at home with his mother and younger sister. His mother describes Tyler as.


Living With a Borderline Personality Disorder Diagnosis


Verified by Psychology Today. In Borderline Personality Disorder: Early Development I described how the young child must integrate multiple images self and object representations into a coherent, unitary, relatively consistent and stable sense of himself and the personality disorder case study examples people objects in his life.

The person who suffers from Borderline Personality disorder has a greater than usual vulnerability to a regressive re splitting of his objects and himself when under stress. A clinical example follows:. S was an attractive, very bright young woman who entered into an intensive Psychotherapy to deal with issues related to her chronic insecurity and unhappiness and her tendency to get involved with unsuitable and disappointing men. Early on a pattern became apparent. She tended to heavily idealize new men she met, as long as they met certain threshold criteria particularly in terms of their looks, intelligenceand job prospects.

For the first month or two of datingpersonality disorder case study examples, the new relationship would be all I heard about in her sessions. Nothing else mattered in her life and all efforts to engage her in reflection about the man in question about whom she often offered very early signs that all was not as rosy as she believed were met with an angry accusation that I didn't want her to be happy, personality disorder case study examples.

In fact, she would continue, this man was the answer to all her problems and I didn't want it to work out because if it did, she wouldn't need my help anymore and I wouldn't get her money! She would fantasize about marriage and their future together for several sessions and then, without any apparent warning, he would disappear from her sessions. Upon my inquiry, she would mention that she had stopped seeing him because he was a personality disorder case study examples. Her ability to explore what had happened was very limited for quite a while but eventually we were able to understand what typically happened.

He was extremely talented and very good looking; he was quite well known in his field. In addition, he was as excited by her as she was by him. She blandly mentioned that, personality disorder case study examples, though he and she were both in their 30s, he still lived with his mother.

Further, until he met her so he told her he had only dated women younger than Either of these facts, on their own, would be sufficient to at least raise questions about whether this man had the requisite emotional health and maturity for a long term relationship. Furthermore, because I was quite aware of her tendency to use important others as "self objects" ie, as means for stabilizing a positive sense of herself; see below I had some reason to expect he had a similar level of self-pathology.

In such cases, as soon as the important other disappoints, they lose their value as an external buttress for the damaged person's self-esteem. Such people, which includes but is not limited to Narcissistic and Borderline characters, tend to "split" objects into all-good and all-bad.

When an all-good object fails them, the person's rage at the disappointment and sense of shame causes the object to shift to become all-bad. Usually the relationship ends at that point. This is one of the difficulties in conducting therapy personality disorder case study examples such people; disappointments are inevitable in every human interaction and maintaining the therapy in the face of such reactions is a difficult technical problem.

The dynamic is as follows: if a "perfect" person loves me, then by reflection off of their image, I must be perfect, too. This personality disorder case study examples one way that Narcissists and Borderlines attempt to stabilize their sense of themselves and protect themselves from feeling defective and damaged.

For the purposes of this discussion, the salient aspect is that once the inevitable disappointment occurred, a transformation in my patient's emotional life took place that was a marvel to witness. Not only was he a terrible disappointment and a loser but he had always been a terrible disappointment and a loser. She insisted she had always known that he was inappropriate "how could someone who still lives with his mother at 35 be much of a man" but had chosen to overlook his shortcomings, knowing it wouldn't last, because she had enjoyed dating him, and psychologically needed him to be her perfect lover.

It is important to recognize that not only did the ex-boyfriend become, in the present and the past, a different person, personality disorder case study examples, but she experienced herself as a different person as well. She had been deeply in love, ready to make the move into marriage and family ; an entire new aspect of her life was about to unfold. Her future husband was flawless and so was she. In fact, he needed to be imagined as perfect in order for her to feel that she was perfect.

When he failed her by dating an 18 year old while they were supposedly personality disorder case study examples love the disappointment meant that if he remained perfect, she would have to accept that she was deeply flawed; otherwise why would he reject her?

Her rage would not tolerate such an outcome which would have led to a serious depression so she devalued him; he became worthless and she maintained her protective sense of herself as without flaws. In order to protect herself from knowing of her obviously flawed choice, she had to change her memory to "remember" that he had always been a poor choice. It took many years of work before she was able to tolerate recognizing her own imperfections and she had to negotiate significant depression and rage to arrive at some comfort with a more accurate picture of herself, flaws and all.

In the next installment I plan on discussing some of the various treatment options at our disposal for helping people with Borderline Personality Disorder. Wow, I am Borderline and see myself so much in this article. I'm going to discuss this with my therapist tomorrow, as I am struggling with understanding my past failed relationships and how to improve future ones. Thank you!

I think you have some good insights about this case; however, you are missing a very important piece of this woman's story. I am a clinical social worker for survivors of domestic violence.

Mental health practitioners have historically blamed the victim in DV situations, citing their "pathology" as the cause of the issues in the relationship. This ignores the dynamics of power and control and the role of male privilege in such relationships, personality disorder case study examples. Perpetrators often seek out vulnerable people whom they think they can manipulate and abuse, as opposed to the victim choosing to enter into abusive relationships.

I would strongly encourage you to take a training on domestic violence and how to assess for it and how to help patients in such situations as opposed to psychoanalyzing and pathologizing them and ignoring the powerful sociocultural influences at hand. Alyssa, how is it that you jumped to this conclusion about this case. Maybe the doctor ruled out the external factors you're concerned with?

I should add that my brother has had a similar pattern with women. This case study could have easily been about a man, such as my brother. But kind of short and not very involved. I have BPD and I want to learn more about splitting and this stuff but this article wasn't really enough to tell me anything new. I just wish I could find more information about it. Why have our nightmares changed from Godzilla to Vampires?

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Scientific Reform Works. Dialectics in Psychotherapy. Perry R, personality disorder case study examples. Branson M. A clinical example follows: Ms. After several iterations, the pattern repeated: my patient met the "perfect man. Branson, I think you have some good insights about this case; however, you are missing a very important piece personality disorder case study examples this woman's story. Reply to Alyssa Submitted by Margie on August 11, personality disorder case study examples, - am.

Interesting Submitted by Angela on April 6, - am. Post Comment Your name, personality disorder case study examples. E-mail The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.

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Case Study: Borderline Personality Disorder | Psychology Student

 

personality disorder case study examples

 

Mar 29,  · The person who suffers from Borderline Personality disorder has a greater than usual vulnerability to a regressive This case study could have easily been about a . Aug 21,  · Diagnosis: Borderline Personality Disorder Background Outline the major symptoms of this disorder. The DSM – V describes Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) as a disorder that manifests in early adulthood as a pattern of instability in “relationships, self-image, and affects, and impulsivity” (p. ). Criteria for BPD includes, the individual portrays aggressive effort to avoid real. Nov 19,  · Jordan's case is only one of many examples of borderline personality disorder, which varies widely among the people who have it. For example: Some people with BPD have supportive families, like Jordan's, while others grow up in traumatizing environments (a life experience that's linked to the development of BPD symptoms).